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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

ingenuous nature should not be checked by the over-cautious maxims of 

political prudence. No advantage, obtained by such frigidity, can 

compensate for the want of those warm effusions of the heart into the 

bosom of a friend, which are doubtless among the most exquisite 

pleasures. At the same time, however, it must be owned, that they often 

by the inevitable lot of humanity, make way for the bitterest pains 

which the breast can experience. Happy beyond the common condition of 

her sex, is she who has found a friend indeed; open hearted, yet 

discreet; generously fervent, yet steady; thoroughly virtuous, but not 

severe; wise, as well as cheerful! Can such a friend be loved too much, 

or cherished too tenderly? If to excellence and happiness there be any 

one way more compendious than another, next to friendship with the 

Supreme Being, it is this. 

 

But when a mixture of minds so beautiful and so sweet takes place, it is 

generally, or rather always the result of early prepossession, casual 

intercourse, or in short, a combination of such causes as are not to be 

brought together by management or design. This noble plant may be 

cultivated; but it must grow spontaneously. 

 

 

ON THE CHOICE OF A HUSBAND. 

 

Assist me, ye Nine, 

While the youth I define, 

With whom I in wedlock would class; 

And ye blooming fair, 

Lend a listening ear, 

To approve of the man as you pass. 

 

Not the changeable fry 

Who love, nor know why, 

But follow bedup'd by their passions: 

Such votaries as these 

Are like waves of the seas, 

And steer'd by their own inclinations. 

 

The hectoring blade 

How unfit for the maid, 

Where meekness and modesty reigns! 

Such a blundering bully 

I'll speak against truly, 

Whatever I get for my pains. 

 

Not the dogmatic elf, 

Whose great all is himself, 

Whose alone _ipse dixit_ is law: 

What a figure he'll make, 

How like Momus he'll speak 

With sneering burlesque, a pshaw! pshaw! 

 

Not the covetous wretch 

Whose heart's at full stretch 

To gain an inordinate treasure; 

Him leave with the rest, 

And such mortals detest, 

Who sacrifice life without measure. 

 

The fluttering fop, 

How empty his top! 

Nay, but some call him coxcomb, I trow; 

But 'tis losing your time, 

He's not worth half a rhyme, 

Let the fag ends of prose bind his brow. 

 

The guttling sot, 

What a conduit his throat! 

How beastly and vicious his life! 


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