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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

Where drunkards prevail, 

Whole families feel, 

Much more an affectionate wife. 

 

One character yet; 

I with sorrow repeat, 

And O! that the number were less; 

'Tis the blasphemous crew: 

What a pattern they'll shew 

To their hapless and innocent race! 

 

Let wisdom then shine 

In the youth that is mine, 

Whilst virtue his footsteps impress; 

Such I'd choose for my mate, 

Whether sooner or late: 

Tell me, Ladies, what think you of this? 

 

"The chief point to be regarded," says Lady Pennington in her Advice to 

her Daughters, "in the choice of a companion for life, is a really 

virtuous principle--an unaffected goodness of heart. Without this, you 

will be continually shocked by indecency, and pained by impiety. So 

numerous have been the unhappy victims to the ridiculous opinion, _a 

reformed libertine makes the best husband_--that, did not experience 

daily evince the contrary, one would believe it impossible for a girl 

who has a tolerable degree of common understanding, to be made the dupe 

of so erroneous a position, which has not the least shadow of reason for 

its foundation, and which a small share of observation will prove to be 

false in fact. A man who has been conversant with the worst sort of 

women, is very apt to contract a bad opinion of, and a contempt for, the 

sex in general. Incapable of esteeming any, he is suspicious of all; 

jealous without cause, angry without provocation, his own disturbed 

imagination is a continued source of ill-humor. To this is frequently 

joined a bad habit of body, the natural consequence of an irregular 

life, which gives an additional sourness to the temper. What rational 

prospect of happiness can there be with such a companion? And, that this 

is the general character of those who are called _reformed rakes_, 

observation will certify. But, admit there may be some exceptions, it is 

a hazard upon which no considerate woman would venture the peace of her 

whole life. The vanity of those girls who believe themselves capable of 

working miracles of this kind, and who give up their persons to men of 

libertine principles, upon the wild expectation of reclaiming them, 

justly deserves the disappointment which it will generally meet with; 

for, believe me, a wife is, of all persons, the least likely to succeed 

in such an attempt. Be it your care to find that virtue in a lover which 

you must never hope to form in a husband. Good sense, and good nature, 

are almost equally requisite. If the former is wanting, it will be next 


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