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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

to an impossibility for you to esteem the person, of whose behavior you 

may have cause to be ashamed. Mutual esteem is as essential to happiness 

in the married state, as mutual affection. Without the latter, every day 

will bring with it some fresh cause of vexation, until repeated quarrels 

produce a coldness, which will settle into an irreconcilable aversion, 

and you will become, not only each other's torment, but the object of 

contempt to your family, and to your acquaintance. 

 

"This quality of good nature is, of all others, the most difficult to be 

ascertained, on account of the general mistake of blending it with 

good-humor, as if they were in themselves the same; whereas, in fact, no 

two principles of action are more essentially different. But this may 

require some explanation. By good nature, I mean that true benevolence, 

which partakes in the felicity of every individual within the reach of 

its ability, which relieves the distressed, comforts the afflicted, 

diffuses blessings, and communicates happiness, far as its sphere of 

action can extend; and which, in the private scenes of life, will shine 

conspicuous in the dutiful son, in the affectionate husband, the 

indulgent father, the faithful friend, and in the compassionate master 

both to man and beast. Good humor, on the other hand, is nothing more 

than a cheerful, pleasing deportment, arising either from a natural 

gaiety of mind, or from an affection of popularity, joined to an 

affability of behavior, the result of good breeding, and from a ready 

compliance with the taste of every company. This kind of mere good humor 

is, by far, the most striking quality. It is frequently mistaken for and 

complimented with the superior name of _real good nature_. A man, by 

this specious appearance, has often acquired that appellation who, in 

all the actions of private life, has been a morose, cruel, revengeful, 

sullen, haughty tyrant. Let them put on the cap, whose temples fit the 

galling wreath! 

 

"A man of a truly benevolent disposition, and formed to promote the 

happiness of all around him, may sometimes, perhaps, from an ill habit 

of body, an accidental vexation, or from a commendable openness of 

heart, above the meanness of disguise, be guilty of little sallies of 

peevishness, or of ill humor, which, carrying the appearance of ill 

nature, may be unjustly thought to proceed from it, by persons who are 

unacquainted with his true character, and who, take ill humor and ill 

nature to be synonymous terms, though in reality they bear not the least 

analogy to each other. In order to the forming a right judgment, it is 


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