Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

intimacy on every side; let your wife never be kept ignorant of your 

income, your expenses, your friendships, or aversions; let her know your 

very faults, but make them amiable by your virtues; consider all 

concealment as a breach of fidelity; let her never have any thing to 

find out in your character; and remember, that from the moment one of 

the partners turns spy upon the other, they have commenced a state of 

hostility. 

 

Seek not for happiness in singularity; and dread a refinement of wisdom 

as a deviation into folly. Listen not to those sages who advise you 

always to scorn the counsel of a woman, and if you comply with her 

requests pronounce you to be wife-ridden. 

 

I said that the person of your lady would not grow more pleasing to you; 

but pray let her never suspect that it grows less so: that a woman will 

pardon an affront to her understanding much sooner than one to her 

person, is well known; nor will any of us contradict the assertion. All 

our attainments, all our arts, are employed to gain and keep the heart 

of man: and what mortification can exceed the disappointment, if the end 

be not obtained? There is no reproof however pointed, no punishment 

however severe, that a woman of spirit will not prefer to neglect; and 

if she can endure it without complaint, it only proves that she means to 

make herself amends by the attention of others for the slights of her 

husband. For this, and for every reason, it behoves a married man not to 

let his politeness fail, though his ardor may abate, but to retain at 

least that general civility towards his own lady which he is so willing 

to pay to every other, and not show a wife of eighteen or twenty years 

old, that every man in company can treat her with more complaisance than 

he, who so often vowed to her eternal fondness. 

 

It is not my opinion that a young woman should be indulged in every wild 

wish of her gay heart or giddy head; but contradiction may be softened 

by domestic kindness, and quiet pleasures substituted in the place of 

noisy ones. Public amusements are not indeed so expensive as is 

sometimes imagined, but they tend to alienate the minds of married 

people from each other. A well chosen society of friends and 

acquaintance, more eminent for virtue and good sense than for gaiety and 

splendor, where the conversation of the day may afford comment for the 

evening, seems the most rational pleasure this great town can afford. 

 

That your own superiority should always be seen, but never felt, seems 

an excellent general rule. A wife should outshine her husband in 


Page 2 from 7:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   7   Forward