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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

nothing, not even in her dress. The bane of married happiness among the 

city men in general has been, that finding themselves unfit for polite 

life, they transferred their vanity to their ladies, dressed them up 

gaily, and sent them out a gallanting, while the good man was to regale 

with port wine or rum punch, perhaps among mean companions, after the 

compting house was shut. This practice produced the ridicule thrown on 

them in all our comedies and novels since commerce began to prosper. But 

now that I am so near the subject, a word or two on jealousy may not be 

amiss; for though not a failing of the present age's growth, yet the 

seeds of it are too certainly sown in every warm bosom, for us to 

neglect it as a fault of no consequence. If you are ever tempted to be 

jealous, watch your wife narrowly--but never tease her; tell her your 

jealousy but conceal your suspicion; let her, in short, be satisfied 

that it is only your odd temper, and even troublesome attachment, that 

makes you follow her; but let her not dream that you ever doubted 

seriously of her virtue even for a moment. If she is disposed towards 

jealousy of you, let me beseech you to be always explicit with her and 

never mysterious: be above delighting in her pain, of all things--nor do 

your business nor pay your visits with an air of concealment, when all 

you are doing might as well be proclaimed perhaps in the parish vestry. 

But I hope better than this of your tenderness and of your virtue, and 

will release you from a lecture you have so little need of, unless your 

extreme youth and my uncommon regard will excuse it. And now farewell; 

make my kindest compliments to your wife, and be happy in proportion as 

happiness is wished you by, Dear Sir, &c. 

 

 

GARRICK'S ADVICE TO MARRIED LADIES. 

 

Ye fair married dames who so often deplore 

That a lover once blest is a lover no more; 

Attend to my counsel, nor blush to be taught 

That prudence must cherish what beauty has caught. 

 

The bloom on your cheek, and the glance of your eye, 

Your roses and lilies may make the men sigh; 

But roses, and lilies, and sighs pass away, 

And passion will die as your beauties decay. 

 

Use the man that you wed like your fav'rite guitar, 

Though music in both, they are both apt to jar; 

How tuneful and soft from a delicate touch, 

Not handled too roughly, nor play'd on too much! 

 

The sparrow and linnet will feed from your hand, 

Grow tame by your kindness, and come at command: 

Exert with your husband the same happy skill, 


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