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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

year to comply with its demands; but such was the backwardness to 

matrimony, and perversity of the Roman knights, and others, that every 

possible method was taken to evade the penalty inflicted upon them, and 

some of them even married children in the cradle for that purpose; thus 

fulfilling the letter, they avoided the spirit of the law, and though 

actually married, had no restraint upon their licentiousness, nor any 

incumbrance by the expense of a family. 

 

 

POWER OF MARRYING. 

 

Among nations which had shaken off the authority of the church of Rome, 

the priests still retained almost an exclusive power of joining men and 

women together in marriage. This appears rather, however, to have been 

by the tacit consent of the civil power, than from any defect in its 

right and authority; for in the time of Oliver Cromwell, marriages were 

solemnized frequently by the justices of the peace; and the clergy 

neither attempted to invalidate them, nor make the children proceeding 

from them illegitimate; and when the province of New England was first 

settled, one of the earliest laws of the colony was, that the power of 

marrying should belong to the magistrates. How different was the case 

with the first French settlers in Canada! For many years a priest had 

not been seen in the country, and a magistrate could not marry: the 

consequence was natural; men and woman joined themselves together as 

husband and wife, trusting to the vows and promises of each other. 

Father Charlevoix, a Jesuit, at last travelled into those wild regions, 

found many of the simple, innocent inhabitants living in that manner; 

with all of whom he found much fault, enjoined them to do penance, and 

afterwards married them. After the Restoration, the power of marrying 

again reverted to the clergy. The magistrate, however, had not entirely 

resigned his right to that power; but it was by a late act of parliament 

entirely surrendered to them, and a penalty annexed to the solemnization 

of it by any other person whatever. 

 

 

CELIBACY OF THE CLERGY. 

 

At a synod held at Winchester under St. Dunstan, the monks averred, that 

so highly criminal was it for a priest to marry, that even a wooden 

cross had audibly declared against the horrid practice. Others place the 

first attempt of this kind, to the account of Aelfrick, archbishop of 

Canterbury, about the beginning of the eleventh century; however this 

may be, we have among the canons a decree of the archbishops of 

Canterbury, and York, ordaining, That all ministers of God, especially 


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