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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

priests, should observe chastity, and not take wives: and in the year 

1076, there was a council assembled at Winchester, under Lanfranc, which 

decreed, that no canon should have a wife; that such priests as lived in 

castles and villages should not be obliged to put their wives away, but 

that such as had none should not be allowed to marry; and that bishops 

should not ordain priests or deacons, unless they previously declared 

that they were not married. In the year 1102, archbishop Anselm held a 

council at Westminster, where it was decreed, that no archdeacon, 

priest, deacon, or canon, should either marry a wife, or retain her if 

he had one. Anselm, to give this decree greater weight, desired of the 

king, that the principal men of the kingdom might be present at the 

council, and that the decree might be enforced by the joint consent both 

of the clergy and laity; the king consented, and to these canons the 

whole realm gave a general sanction. The clergy of the province of York, 

however, remonstrated against them, and refused to put away their wives; 

the unmarried refused also to oblige themselves to continue in that 

state; nor were the clergy of Canterbury much more tractable. 

 

In the celibacy of the clergy, we may discover also the origin of 

nunneries; the intrigues they could procure, while at confession, were 

only short, occasional, and with women whom they could not entirely 

appropriate to themselves; to remedy which, they probably fabricated the 

scheme of having religious houses, where young women should be shut up 

from the world, and where no man but a priest, on pain of death, should 

enter. That in these dark retreats, secluded from censure, and from the 

knowledge of the world, they might riot in licentiousness. They were 

sensible, that women, surrounded with the gay and the amiable, might 

frequently spurn at the offers of a cloistered priest, but that while 

confined entirely to their own sex, they would take pleasure in a visit 

from one of the other, however slovenly and unpolished. In the world at 

large, should the crimes of the women be detected, the priests have no 

interest in mitigating their punishment; but here the whole community of 

them are interested in the secret of every intrigue, and should Lucinda 

unluckily proclaim it, she can seldom do it without the walls of the 

convent, and if she does, the priests lay the crime on some luckless 

laic, that the holy culprit may come off with impunity. 

 

 

DESPERATE ACT OF EUTHIRA. 

 

In ancient and modern history, we are frequently presented with accounts 


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