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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

of women, who, preferring death to slavery or prostitution, sacrificed 

their lives with the most undaunted courage to avoid them. Apollodorus 

tells us, that Hercules having taken the city of Troy, prior to the 

famous siege of it celebrated by Homer, carried away captive the 

daughters of Laomedon then king. One of these, named Euthira, being left 

with several other Trojan captives on board the Grecian fleet, while the 

sailors went on shore to take in fresh provisions, had the resolution to 

propose, and the power to persuade her companions, to set the ships on 

fire, and to perish themselves amid the devouring flames. The women of 

Phoenicia met together before an engagement which was to decide the fate 

of their city, and having agreed to bury themselves in the flames, if 

their husbands and relations were defeated, in the enthusiasm of their 

courage and resolution, they crowned her with flowers who first made the 

proposal. Many instances occur in the history of the Romans of the Gauls 

and Germans, and of other nations in subsequent periods; where women 

being driven to despair by their enemies, have bravely defended their 

walls, or waded through fields of blood to assist their countrymen, and 

free themselves from slavery or from ravishment. Such heroic efforts are 

beauties, even in the character of the softer sex, when they proceed 

from necessity: when from choice, they are blemishes of the most 

unnatural kind, indicating a heart of cruelty, lodged in a form which 

has the appearance of gentleness and peace. 

 

It has been alleged by some of the writers on human nature, that to the 

fair sex the loss of beauty is more alarming and insupportable than the 

loss of life; but even this loss, however opposite to the feelings of 

their nature, they have voluntarily consented to sustain, that they 

might not be the objects of temptation to the lawless ravisher. The nuns 

of a convent in France, fearing they should be violated by a ruffian 

army, which had taken by storm the town in which their convent was 

situated, at the recommendation of their abbess, mutually agreed to cut 

off all their noses, that they might save their chastity by becoming 

objects of disgust instead of desire. Were we to descend to particulars, 

we could give innumerable instances of women, who from Semiramis down to 

the present time, have distinguished themselves by their courage. Such 

was Penthesilea, who, if we may credit ancient story, led her army of 

viragoes to the assistance of Priam, king of Troy; Thomyris, who 

encountered Cyrus, king of Persia; and Thalestris, famous for her 


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