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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

did not prosper in the hands of a Grecian, he did not endeavor to become 

more engaging in his manners and person, he did not lavish his fortune 

in presents, or become more obliging and assiduous in his addresses, but 

immediately had recourse to incantations and philtres; in composing and 

dispensing of which, the women of Thessaly were reckoned the most 

famous, and drove a traffic in them of no considerable advantage. These 

potions were given by the women to the men, as well as by the men to the 

women, and were generally so violent in their operations as for some 

time to deprive the person who took them, of sense, and not uncommonly 

of life: their composition was a variety of herbs of the most strong and 

virulent nature, which we shall not mention; but herbs were not the only 

things they relied on for their purpose; they called in the productions 

of the animal and mineral kingdoms to their assistance; when these 

failed, they roasted an image of wax before the fire, representing the 

object of their love, and as this became warm, they flattered themselves 

that the person represented by it would be proportionally warmed with 

love. When a lover could obtain any thing belonging to his mistress, he 

imagined it of singular advantage, and deposited in the earth beneath 

the threshold of her door. Besides these, they had a variety of other 

methods equally ridiculous and unavailing, and of which it would be 

trifling to give a minute detail; we shall, therefore, just take notice 

as we go along, that such of either sex as believed themselves forced 

into love by the power of philtres and charms, commonly had recourse to 

the same methods to disengage themselves, and break the power of these 

enchantments, which they supposed operated involuntarily on their 

inclinations; and thus the old women of Greece, like the lawyers of 

modern times, were employed to defeat the schemes and operations of each 

other, and like them too, it is presumable, laughed in their sleeves, 

while they hugged the gains that arose from vulgar credulity. 


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