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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

sometimes liable, endeavored to persuade mankind that long hair was 

criminal, in order to reduce the whole to a similarity with themselves. 

Amongst these, St. Wulstan eminently distinguished himself. "He rebuked," 

says William of Malmsbury, "the wicked of all ranks with great boldness, 

but was _peculiarly_ severe upon those who were proud of their long 

hair. When any of these vain people bowed their heads before him, to 

receive his blessing, before he gave it he cut a lock from their hair, 

with a sharp penknife, which he carried about him for that purpose; and 

commanded them, by way of penance for their sins, to cut all the rest in 

the same manner: if any of them refused to comply with his command he 

reproached them for their effeminacy, and denounced the most dreadful 

judgments against them. Such, however, was the value of their hair in 

these days, that many rather submitted to his censures than part with 

it; and such was the folly of the church, and of this saint in 

particular, that the most solemn judgments were denounced against 

multitudes, for no other crime than not making use of pen-knives and 

scissors, to cut off an ornament bestowed by nature." 

 

 

ST. VALENTINE'S DAY. 

 

On St. Valentine's day, it is customary, in many parts of Italy, for an 

unmarried lady to choose, from among the young gentlemen of her 

acquaintance, one to be her guardian or gallant; who, in return for the 

honor of this appointment, presents to her some nosegays, or other 

trifles, and thereby obliges himself to attend her in the most 

obsequious manner in all her parties of pleasure, and to all her public 

amusements, for the space of one year, when he may retire, and the lady 

may choose another in his place. But in the course of this connection it 

frequently happens, that they contract such an inclination to each 

other, as prompts them to be coupled for life. In the times of the 

chivalry, we have seen that the men gloried in protecting the women, and 

the women thought themselves safe and happy when they obtained that 

protection. It is probable, therefore, that this custom, though now more 

an affair of gallantry than of protection, is a relic of chivalry still 

subsisting among that romantic and sentimental people. 

 

But the observation of some peculiar customs on St. Valentine's day is 

not confined to Italy; almost all Europe has joined in distinguishing it 

by some particular ceremony. As it always happens about that time of the 

year, when the genial influences of the spring begin to operate, it has 


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