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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

newly slaughtered. And, indeed, the whole of the festivals of Bacchus, a 

deity much worshipped in Greece, were celebrated with rites either 

ridiculous, obscene, or madly extravagant. There were others, however, 

in honor of the other gods and goddesses, which were more decent, and 

had more the appearance of religious solemnity, though even in these, 

the women dressed out in all their finery; and, adorned with flowers and 

garlands, either formed splendid processions, or assisted in performing 

ceremonies, the general tendency of which was to amuse rather than 

instruct. 

 

 

THE DEATHS OF LUCRETIA AND VIRGINIA. 

 

The force of prejudice appears in nothing more strongly than in the 

encomiums which have been lavished upon Lucretia for laying violent 

hands upon herself, and Virginius for killing his own daughter. These 

actions seem to derive all their glory from the revolutions to which 

they gave rise, as the former occasioned the abolition of monarchy 

amongst the Romans, and the latter put an end to the arbitrary power of 

the decemviri. But if we lay aside our prepossessions for antiquity, and 

examine these actions without prejudice, we cannot but acknowledge, 

that they are rather the effects of human weakness and obstinacy than of 

resolution and magnanimity. Lucretia, for fear of worldly censure, chose 

rather to submit to the lewd desires of Tarquin, than have it thought 

that she had been stabbed in the embraces of a slave; which sufficiently 

proves that all her boasted virtue was founded upon vanity, and too high 

a value for the opinion of mankind. The younger Pliny, with great 

reason, prefers to this famed action that of a woman of low birth, whose 

husband being seized with an incurable disorder, chose rather to perish 

with him than survive him. The action of Arria is likewise much more 

noble, whose husband Paetus, being condemned to death, plunged a dagger 

in her breast, and told him, with a dying voice, "Paetus, it is not 

painful." But the death of Lucretia gave rise to a revolution, and it 

therefore became illustrious; though, as St. Augustine justly observes, 

it is only an instance of the weakness of a woman, too solicitous about 

the opinion of the world. 

 

Virginius, in killing his daughter, to preserve her from falling a 

victim to the lust of the decemvir Claudius, was guilty of the highest 

rashness; since he might certainly have gained the people, already 

irritated against the tyrant, without imbruing his hands in his own 

blood. This action may indeed be extenuated, as Virginius slew his 

daughter from a false principle of honor, and did it to preserve her 


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