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THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

the direct view of the observer, and operate prejudicially on the face 

by contrast, overpowering the little color which by reflection they 

should heighten. The fronts of bonnets so lined, therefore, do not widen 

greatly forward, and bring their color into contrast. 

 

When bonnets do widen, the proper contrast is used as a lining; but then 

it has not a surface much adapted for reflection, otherwise it may 

perform that office, and injure the complexion. 

 

Understanding, then, the application of these colors in a general way, 

it may be noticed, that fair faces are by contrast best acted on by 

light colors, and dark faces by darker colors. 

 

Dark faces are best affected by darker colors, evidently because they 

tend to render the complexion fairer; and fair faces do not require dark 

colors, because the opposition would be too strong. 

 

Objects which constitute a background to the face, or which, on the 

contrary, reflect their hues upon it, always either improve or injure 

the complexion. For this and some other reasons, many persons look 

better at home in their apartments than in the streets. Apartments may, 

indeed, be peculiarly calculated to improve individual complexions. 

 

 

OF MIND. 

 

External indications as to mind may be derived from figure, from gait, 

and from dress. 

 

As to figure, a certain symmetry or disproportion of parts (either of 

which depends immediately upon the locomotive system)--or a certain 

softness or hardness of form (which belongs exclusively to the vital 

system)--these reciprocally denote a locomotive symmetry or 

disproportion--or a vital softness or hardness--or a mental delicacy or 

coarseness, which will be found also indicated by the features of the 

face. 

 

These qualities are marked in pairs, as each belonging to its respective 

system; for, without this, there can be no accurate or useful 

observation. 

 

As to gait, that progression which advances, unmodified by any lateral 

movement of the body, or any perpendicular rising of the head, and which 

belongs exclusively to the locomotive system--or that soft lateral 

rolling of the body, which belongs exclusively to the vital system--or 

that perpendicular rising or falling of the head at every impulse to 

step, which belongs exclusively to the mental system--these reciprocally 

indicate a corresponding locomotive, or vital, or mental character, 

which will be found also indicated by the features of the face. 

 

To put to the test the utility of these elements of observation and 

indication, let us take a few instances.--If, in any individual, 


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