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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

the left. 

 

The habits of the seamstress are indicated by the neck suddenly bending 

forward, and the arms being, even in walking, considerably bent forward 

or folded more or less upward from the elbows. 

 

Habits of labor are indicated by a considerable thickness of the 

shoulders below, where they form an angle with the inner part of the 

arm; and, where these habits are of the lowest menial kind, the elbows 

are turned outward, and the palms of the hands backward. 

 

 

OF AGE. 

 

External indications of age are required chiefly where the face is 

veiled, or where the woman observed precedes the observer and may 

reasonably excite his interest. 

 

In either of these cases, if the foot and ankle have lost a certain 

moderate plumpness, and assumed a certain sinewy or bony appearance, the 

woman has generally passed the period of youth. 

 

If in walking, instead of the ball or outer edge of the foot first 

striking the ground, it is the heel which does so, then has the woman in 

general passed the meridian of life. Unlike the last indication, this is 

apparent, however the foot and ankle may be clothed.--The reason of this 

indication is the decrease of power which unfits the muscles to receive 

the weight of the body by maintaining the extension of the ankle-joint. 

 

Exceptions to this last indication are to be found chiefly in women in 

whom the developments of the body are proportionally much greater, 

either from a temporary or a permanent cause, than those of the limbs, 

the muscles of which are consequently incapable of receiving the weight 

of the body by maintaining the extension of the ankle-joint. 

 


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