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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

 

 

 

 

 

_THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY_; 

 

OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE 

OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI. 

 

 

The Venus de Medici at Florence is the most perfect specimen of ancient 

sculpture remaining; and is spoken of as the Model of Female Beauty. It 

was so much a favorite of the Greeks and Romans, that a hundred ancient 

repetitions of this statue have been noticed by travellers. This statue 

is said to have been found in the forum of Octavia at Rome. It 

represents woman at that age when every beauty has just been perfected. 

 

"The Venus de Medici at Florence," says a distinguished writer, "is like 

a rose which, after a beautiful daybreak, expands its leaves to the 

first ray of the sun, and represents that age when the limbs assume a 

more finished form and the breast begins to develop itself." 

 

The size of the head is sufficiently small to leave that predominance to 

the vital organs in the chest, which, as already said, makes the 

nutritive system peculiarly that of woman. This is the first and most 

striking proof of the profound knowledge of the artist, the principles 

of whose art taught him that a vast head is not a constituent of female 

beauty. In mentioning the head it is scarcely possible to avoid noticing 

the rich curls of hair. 

 

The eyes next fix our attention by their soft, sweet, and glad 

expression. This is produced with exquisite art. To give softness, the 

ridges of the eyebrows are rounded. To give sweetness, the under eyelid, 

which I would call the expressive one, is slightly raised. To give the 

expression of gladness or of pleasure, the opening of the eyelids is 

diminished, in order to diminish, or partially to exclude, the excess of 

those impressions, which make even pleasure painful. Other exquisite 

details about those eyes, confer on them unparallelled beauty. Still, 

this look is far from those traits indicative of lasciviousness, with 

which some modern artists have thought to characterize their Venuses. 

 

Art still profounder was perhaps shown in the configuration of the nose. 

The peculiar connexion of this sense with love was evidently well 

understood by the artist. Not only is smell peculiarly associated with 

love, in all the higher animals, but it is associated with reproduction 

in plants, the majority of which evolve delicious odors only when the 

flowers or organs of fructification are displayed. Connected, indeed, 

with the capacity of the nose, and the cavities which open into it, is 

the projection of the whole middle part of the face. 

 

The mouth is rendered sweet and delicate by the lips being undeveloped 


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