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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

veneris; the contiguous elevation of the thighs which, almost at their 

commencement rise as high as it does; the admirable expansion of these 

bodies inward, or toward each other, by which they almost seem to 

intrude upon each other, and to exclude each from its respective place; 

the general narrowness of the upper, and the unembraceable expansion of 

the lower part thus exquisitely formed;--all these admirable 

characteristics of female form, the mere existence of which in woman 

must, one is tempted to imagine, be even to herself, a source of 

ineffable pleasure--these constitute a being worthy, as the 

personification of beauty, of occupying the temples of Greece; present 

an object finer, alas! than nature seems even capable of producing; and 

offer to all nations and ages a theme of admiration and delight. 

 

Well might Thomson say:-- 

 

"So stands the statue that enchants the world, 

So bending tries to veil the matchless boast, 

The mingled beauties of exulting Greece." 

 

And Byron, in yet higher strain:-- 

 

"There, too, the goddess loves in stone, and fills 

The air around with beauty; 

within the pale 

We stand, and in that form and face behold 

What Mind can make, when Nature's self would fail; 

And to the fond idolaters of old 

Envy the innate flash which such a soul could mould. 

 

We gaze and turn away, and know not where, 

Dazzled and drunk with beauty, till the heart 

Reels with its fulness; there--forever there-- 

Chained to the chariot of triumphal Art, 

We stand as captives, and would not depart." 

 

 

 

 

 

THE FIRST KISS OF LOVE. 

 

BY LORD BYRON. 

 

Away with those fictions of flimsy romance! 

Those tissues of falsehood which folly has wove! 

Give me the mild beam of the soul-breathing glance, 

Or the rapture which dwells on the first kiss of love. 

 

Ye rhymers, whose bosoms with phantasy glow, 

Whose pastoral passions are made for the grove, 

From what blest inspiration your sonnets would flow, 

Could you ever have tasted the first kiss of love! 

 

I hate you, ye cold compositions of art; 

Though prudes may condemn me, and bigots reprove, 

I court the effusions that spring from the heart 

Which throbs with delight to the first kiss of love. 

 

Oh! cease to affirm that man, since his birth, 

From Adam till now, has with wretchedness strove; 

Some portion of paradise still is on earth, 

And Eden revives in the first kiss of love. 

 

When age chills the blood, when our pleasures are past-- 

For years fleet away with the wings of the dove-- 


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