Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

The dearest remembrance will still be the last, 

Our sweetest memorial the first kiss of love. 

 

 

 

 

THE DEATH OF CLEOPATRA. 

 

_See Frontispiece._ 

 

The Princess of antiquity, most renowned for her personal charms, was in 

her unrivalled beauty, her mental perfections, her weaknesses, and the 

unhappy conclusion of an amorous existence the counterpart of the most 

beautiful queen of later times, the unfortunate Mary of Scotland. 

 

Cleopatra was the daughter of Ptolemy Auletes, king of Egypt. She was 

early given to wife to her own brother, Ptolemy Dionysius, and ascended 

the throne conjointly with him, on the death of their father. It was 

doubtless the policy of the kingdom thus to preserve all the royal 

honors in one family--the daughter being the queen, as well as the son 

king of the country. But her ambitious and intriguing spirit, restrained 

by no ties of reciprocal love to her husband, who was also her brother, 

sought for means to burst a union at once unnatural and galling: and the 

opportunity at length arrived. Julius Caesar, the conqueror of the world, 

having pursued the defeated Pompey into Egypt, there beheld Cleopatra in 

the zenith of her beauty; and he before whose power the whole world was 

kneeling, prostrated himself before a pretty woman. The following is the 

account of her first introduction to Caesar, as given by the historian. 

It shows that she had no maidenly scruples as to the mode of attaining 

her ends. 

 

Her intrigues to become sole monarch, had made her husband-brother 

banish her from the capital. Hearing of the arrival of Caesar, she got 

into a small boat, with only one male friend, and in the dusk of the 

evening made for the palace where Caesar as well as her husband lodged. 

As she saw it difficult to enter it undiscovered by her husband's 

friends, she rolled herself up in a carpet. Her companion tied her up at 

full length like a bale of goods, and carried her in at the gates to 

Caesar's apartments. This stratagem of hers, which was a strong proof of 

her wit and ingenuity, is said to have first opened her way to Caesar's 

heart, and her conquest advanced rapidly by the charms of her speech and 

person. The genius of Shakspeare has well depicted the power of her 

beauty at this time. He makes her to say, at a later period of life, 

when chagrined at the expected desertion of another lover,-- 

 

"Broad-fronted Caesar! 

When thou wast here above the ground, I was 

A morsel for a monarch: And great Pompey 

Would stand, and make his eyes grow in my brow; 


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