Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

There would he fix his longing gaze, and die 

With looking on his life." 

 

But Cleopatra, who was not less remarkable for her cunning than for her 

beauty, knowing that Caesar was resolved to be gratified at whatever 

cost, determined that the price should be a round one: the terms of his 

admission to her arms, were that Caesar should expel her brother from the 

kingdom, and give the crown to her; which Caesar complied with. Cleopatra 

had a son by Caesar called Caesarion. 

 

In the civil wars which distracted the Roman empire after the death of 

Caesar, Cleopatra supported Brutus, against Antony and Octavius. Antony, 

in his expedition to Parthia, summoned her to appear before him. She 

arrayed herself in the most magnificent apparel, and appeared before her 

judge in the most captivating attire. Though somewhat older than when 

she drew Caesar to her arms, her charms were still conspicuous; 

 

"Age could not wither her, nor custom stale 

Her infinite variety. Other women cloy 

The appetite they feed. But she made hungry 

Where most she satisfied." 

 

Her artifice on this occasion succeeded; Antony became enamoured of her, 

and publicly married her, although his wife the sister of Octavius was 

living. He gave Cleopatra the greater part of the eastern provinces of 

the Roman empire. This behaviour was the cause of a rupture between 

Octavius and Antony; and these two celebrated generals met in battle at 

Actium, where Cleopatra, by flying with sixty sail of vessels, ruined 

the interest of Antony, and he was defeated. Cleopatra had retired to 

Egypt, where soon after Antony followed her. Antony stabbed himself upon 

the false information that Cleopatra was dead; and as his wound was not 

mortal, he was carried to the queen, who drew him up by a cord from one 

of the windows of the monument, where she had retired and concealed 

herself. 

 

Antony soon after died of his wounds, and Cleopatra, after she had 

received pressing invitations from Octavius, and even pretended 

declarations of love, destroyed herself by the bite of an asp, not to 

fall into the conqueror's hands. She had previously attempted to stab 

herself, and had once made a resolution to starve herself. But the means 

by which she destroyed herself, is said to produce the easiest of 

deaths: the Asp is a small serpent found near the river Nile, so 

delicate that it may be concealed in a fig; and when presented to the 

vitals of the body, its bite is so deadly as to render medical skill 

useless, while at the same time it is so painless, that the victim 

fancies herself dropping into a sweet slumber, instead of the arms of 


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