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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY. 

 

Socrates, being asked, whether it were better for a man to marry, or to 

remain single, replied,--"Let him do either, he will repent of it." 

 

The philosopher spoke 'like an oracle,' leaving the world as much in the 

dark as to his views of the comparative advantages of matrimony and 

celibacy, as they could have been before. But a vast majority of men 

have chosen, since they must repent of one or the other, to repent of 

marrying, deeming perhaps that this repentance is "_the repentance which 

needeth not to be repented of_." 

 

We shall conclude our little treatise on "the sex," with a few remarks 

on the subject of--we were about to say--Happiness,--but as we are 

content that every married man and woman should judge for themselves as 

to the happiness of the married state, we will simply style it an ESSAY 

ON MATRIMONY. 

 

No event is more important, and none is conducted, on many occasions, 

with less prudence, than Marriage. Providence has allowed the passions 

to exercise a powerful influence in this matter, otherwise the cares and 

anxieties with which it is attended would deter most persons from 

launching their bark of earthly happiness on the great ocean of 

matrimony. But too frequently the passions are the only guide, and these 

stimulate to bewilder: they exhibit pleasing and attractive imagery, and 

then the possession destroys the bliss. 

 

Love is a pleasing but exciting passion. The eye is delighted by form, 

manners, and the expression of the features, the ears by musical 

language, and the imagination paints future joys; all of which 

contribute to one great principle, that of receiving happiness from 

those we love, and evincing love for those from whom we derive our 

happiness. As the crystal streams are absorbed by the sun, and 

distributed as brilliant clouds in the heavens, and then fall and run in 

their accustomed channels, and thus the rivers supply the clouds, and 

the vapors the rivers, so is the interchange between love and happiness. 

This will agree with the opinion that love may be occasioned suddenly, 

because enjoyment is expected; or it may arise gradually, because the 

unattractiveness which first existed, may be succeeded by attraction. 

 

There was no appointment by nature of particular persons for each other; 

but we may expect among a great variety of occurrences to meet with some 

singular and astonishing coincidences. Human beings appear to be left in 

this respect, as in many others, to their own judgment. If they act 

discreetly, they enjoy the comfort of it; but if otherwise, they bring 


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