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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

the veins of Seneca were opened by the command of Nero, she caused her 

own to be cut, that she might also bleed to death. When Conrad III. had 

taken the town of Winsberg in Bavaria, he allowed only the women to go 

out; but they had leave to carry with them as much as they pleased. They 

loaded themselves, therefore, with their husbands and children, and 

brought them all out on their shoulders! When love is genuine; when 

professions are sincere, and the practice agreeable therewith; when 

health is enjoyed, and as many comforts as are necessary for this life; 

when children grow up in vigor, good behaviour, and mental improvement; 

when old age is solaced by the company of each other, and the kind 

attention of daughters and sons; then matrimony is a cause of 

happiness. 

 

But if all these enjoyments were the lot of every married person, men 

would become too much contented with the present life, and they would 

scarcely think, as they sail on smoothly, of the haven, for which they 

are bound. Besides, the fascinations of domestic life would attract 

them from many duties which they owe to their fellow creatures. There 

are then many disadvantages connected with matrimony. There is so 

much ignorance, perverseness, undue inclination for power, disposition 

to contradict, anger, jealousy, hatred, and versatility among human 

beings that many unpleasant occurrences will necessarily arise, and 

especially in the marriage state, because here most of these feelings 

are brought into action, and are most sensibly felt by those who are 

subject to their influence. He that paints the experience of human 

life in brilliant colors only gives a flattering and deceptive 

representation,--he may just as well pretend that the heavens are 

always cloudless. People soon discover that there are sorrows in the 

world as well as joys, unpleasant as well as pleasant events; hence 

arises the advantage of examining, of pointing out, and endeavoring 

to avoid "the ills which flesh is heir to." The perpetuity of marriage, 

under pleasing circumstances, is its most lovely character; but the 

same peculiarity, under a different aspect, is its principal source of 

misery. It is too frequently a state of bondage, "which thousands once 

fast-chained to quit no more." But what exists, and cannot be removed, 

should always be borne as patiently as possible; and thus we may keep a 

cheerful heart, when another, less prudent, would be gloomy. Besides, an 

ill temper makes every condition of life unhappy; a cheerful disposition 

will throw a gleam of sunshine over the scenery of a November day. Some 


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