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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

PERSIAN WOMEN. 

 

Several historians, in mentioning the ancient Persians, have dwelt with 

peculiar severity on the manner in which they treated their women. 

Jealous, almost to distraction, they confined the whole sex with the 

strictest attention, and could not bear that the eye of a stranger 

should behold the beauty whom they adored. 

 

When Mahomet, the great legislator of the modern Persians, was just 

expiring, the last advice that he gave to his faithful adherents, was, 

"Be watchful of your religion, and your wives." Hence they pretend to 

derive not only the power of confining, but also of persuading them, 

that they hazard their salvation, if they look upon any other man 

besides their husbands. The Christian religion informs us, that in the 

other world they neither marry, nor are given in marriage. The religion 

of Mahomet teaches us a different doctrine, which the Persians 

believing, carry the jealousy of Asia to the fields of Elysium, and the 

groves of Paradise; where, according to them, the blessed inhabitants 

have their eyes placed on the crown of their heads, lest they should see 

the wives of their neighbors. 

 

To offer the least violence to a Persian woman, was to incur certain 

death from her husband or guardian. Even their kings, though the most 

absolute in the universe, could not alter the manners or customs of the 

country, which related to the fair sex. 

 

Widely different from this is the present state of Persia. By a law of 

that country, their monarch is now authorized to go, whenever he 

pleases, into the harem of any of his subjects; and the subject, on 

whose prerogative he thus encroaches, so far from exerting his usual 

jealousy, thinks himself highly honored by such a visit. 

 

A laughable story, on this subject, is told of Shah Abbas, who having 

got drunk at the house of one of his favorites, and intending to go into 

the apartment of his wives, was stopped by the door-keeper, who bluntly 

told him, "Not a man, sir, besides my master, shall put a mustachio 

here, so long as I am porter." "What," said the king, "dost thou not 

know me?" "Yes," answered the fellow, "I know that you are king of the 

men, but not of the women." 

 

 

GRECIAN WOMEN. 

 

Woman, in ancient Greece, seems to have been regarded merely in the 

light of an instrument for raising up members of the state. And surely 

it may be said of them that they nobly fulfilled this duty. The 

catalogue of heroes and sages which shine in Grecian history bright and 

numerous as stars in the firmament, are so many testimonials to the 

faithfulness of Grecian women in this respect. 


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