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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

 

The sexes were but little society for each other. Even husbands were, in 

Sparta, limited as to the time and duration of the visits made to their 

wives. 

 

That women in ancient Greece did not enjoy that delicate consideration 

which other refined nations accord to their sex, may be inferred from 

the inferiority of the apartments allotted to them. The famous Helen is 

said to have had her chamber in the attic; and Penelope, the queen of 

Ulysses, descended from hers by a ladder. 

 

 

GRECIAN COURTEZANS. 

 

The rank which the courtezans enjoyed, even in the brightest ages of 

Greece, and particularly at Athens, is one of the greatest singularities 

in the manners of any people. By what circumstances could that order of 

women, who debase at once their own sex and ours--in a country where the 

women were possessed of modesty, and the men of sentiment, arrive at 

distinction, and sometimes even at the highest degree of reputation and 

consequence? Several reasons may be assigned for that phenomenon in 

society. 

 

In Greece, the courtezans were in some measure connected with the 

religion of the country. The Goddess of Beauty had her altars; and she 

was supposed to protect prostitution, which was to her a species of 

worship. The people invoked Venus in times of danger; and, after a 

battle, they thought they had done honor to Miltiades and Themistocles, 

because the Laises and the Glyceras of the age had chaunted hymns to 

their Goddess. 

 

The courtezans were likewise connected with religion, by means of the 

arts. Their persons afforded models for statues, which were afterwards 

adored in the temples. Phryne served as a model to Praxiteles, for his 

Venus of Cnidus. During the feasts of Neptune, near Eleusis, Apelles 

having seen the same courtezan on the sea-shore, without any other veil 

than her loose and flowing hair, was so much struck with her appearance, 

that he borrowed from it the idea of his Venus rising from the waves. 

 

They were, therefore connected with statuary and painting, as they 

furnished the practisers of those arts with the means of embellishing 

their works. 

 

The greater part of them were skilled in music; and, as that art was 

attended with higher effects in Greece than it ever was in any other 

country, it must have possessed, in their hands, an irresistible charm. 

 

Every one knows how enthusiastic the Greeks were of beauty. They adored 

it in the temples. They admired it in the principal works of art. They 

studied it in the exercises and the games. They thought to perfect it by 

their marriages. They offered rewards to it at the public festivals. But 


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