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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

virtuous beauty was seldom to be seen. The modest women were confined to 

their own apartments, and were visited only by their husbands and 

nearest relations. The courtezans offered themselves every where to 

view; and their beauty as might be expected, obtained universal homage. 

 

Greece was governed by eloquent men; and the celebrated courtezans, 

having an influence over those orators must have had an influence on 

public affairs. There was not one, not even the thundering, the 

inflexible Demosthenes, so terrible to tyrants, but was subjected to 

their sway. Of that great master of eloquence it has been said, "What he 

had been a whole year in erecting, a woman overturned in a day." That 

influence augmented their consequence; and their talent of pleasing 

increased with the occasions of exerting it. 

 

The laws and the public institutions, indeed, by authorizing the 

privacy of women, set a high value on the sanctity of the marriage vow. 

But in Athens, imagination, sentiment, luxury, the taste in arts and 

pleasures, was opposite to the laws. The courtezans, therefore may be 

said to have come in support of the manners. 

 

There was no check upon public licentiousness; but private infidelity, 

which concerned the peace of families, was punished as a crime. By a 

strange and perhaps unequalled singularity the men were corrupted, yet 

the domestic manners were pure. It seems as if the courtezans had not 

been considered to belong to their sex; and, by a convention to which 

the laws and the manners bended, while other women were estimated merely 

by their virtues, they were estimated only by their accomplishments. 

 

These reasons will in some measure, account for the honors, which the 

votaries of Venus so often received in Greece. Otherwise we should have 

been at a loss to conceive, why six or seven writers had exerted their 

talents to celebrate the courtezans of Athens--why three great painters 

had uniformly devoted their pencils to represent them on canvass--and 

why so many poets had strove to immortalize them in verses. We should 

hardly have believed that so many illustrious men had courted their 

society--that Aspasia had been consulted in deliberations of peace and 

war--that Phryne had a statue of gold placed between the statues of two 

kings at Delphos--that, after death, magnificent tombs had been erected 

to their memory. 

 

"The traveller," says a Greek writer, "who, approaching to Athens, sees 

on the side of the way a monument which attracts his notice at a 

distance, will imagine that it is the tomb of Miltiades or Pericles, or 


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