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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

of some other great man, who has done honor to his country by his 

services. He advances, he reads, and he learns that it is a courtezan of 

Athens who is interred with so much pomp." 

 

Theopompus, in a letter to Alexander the Great, speaks also of the same 

monument in words to the following effect--"Thus, after her death, is a 

prostitute honored; while not one of those brave warriors who fell in 

Asia, fighting for you, and for the safety of Greece, has so much as a 

stone erected to his memory, or an inscription to preserve his ashes 

from insult." 

 

Such was the homage which that enthusiastic people, voluptuous and 

passionate, paid to beauty. More guided by sentiment than reason, and 

having laws rather than principles, they banished their great men, 

honored their courtezans, murdered Socrates, permitted themselves to be 

governed by Aspasia, preserved inviolate the marriage bed, and placed 

Phryne in the temple of Apollo! 

 

 

 

 

ROMAN WOMEN. 

 

Among the Romans, a grave and austere people, who, during five hundred 

years, were unacquainted with the elegancies and the pleasures of life, 

and who, in the middle of furrows and fields of battle, were employed in 

tillage or in war, the manners of the women were a long time as solemn 

and severe as those of the men, and without the smallest mixture of 

corruption, or of weakness. 

 

The time when the Roman women began to appear in public, marks a 

particular era in history. 

 

The Roman women, for many ages, were respected over the whole world. 

Their victorious husbands re-visited them with transport, at their 

return from battle. They laid at their feet the spoils of the enemy, and 

endeared themselves in their eyes by the wounds which they had received 

for them and for the state. Those warriors often came from imposing 

commands upon kings, and in their own houses accounted it an honor to 

obey. In vain the too rigid laws made them the arbiters of life and 

death. More powerful than the laws, the women ruled their judges. In 

vain the legislature, foreseeing the wants which exist only among a 

corrupt people, permitted divorce. The indulgence of the polity was 

proscribed by the manners. 

 

Such was the influence of beauty at Rome before the licentious 

intercourse of the sexes had corrupted both. 

 

The Roman matrons do not seem to have possessed that military courage 

which Plutarch has praised in certain Greek and barbarian women; they 

partook more of the nature of their sex; or, at least, they departed 

less from its character. Their first quality was decency. Every one 


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