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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

to increase. 

 

A thousand causes concurred to produce this revolution of manners among 

the Romans. The vast inequality of ranks, the enormous fortunes of 

individuals, the ridicule, affixed by the imperial court to moral ideas, 

all contributed to hasten the period of corruption. 

 

There were still, however, some great and virtuous characters among the 

Roman women. Portia, the daughter of Cato, and wife of Brutus, showed 

herself worthy to be associated with the first of human kind, and 

trusted with the fate of empires. After the battle of Phillippi, she 

would neither survive liberty nor Brutus, but died with the bold 

intrepidity of Cato. 

 

The example of Portia was followed by that of Arria, who seeing her 

husband hesitating and afraid to die, in order to encourage him, pierced 

her own breast, and delivered to him the dagger with a smile. 

 

Paulinia too, the wife of Seneca, caused her veins to be opened at the 

same time with her husband's, but being forced to live, during the few 

years which she survived him, "she bore in her countenance," says 

Tacitus, "the honorable testimony of her love, a _paleness_, which 

proved that part of her blood had sympathetically issued with the blood 

of her spouse." 

 

To take notice of all the celebrated women of the empire, would much 

exceed the bounds of the present undertaking. But the empress Julia the 

wife of Septimius Severus, possessed a species of merit so very 

different from any of those already mentioned, as to claim particular 

attention. 

 

This lady was born in Syria, and a daughter of a priest of the sun. It 

was predicted that she would rise to sovereign dignity; and her 

character justified the prophecy. 

 

Julia, while on the throne, loved, or pretended passionately to love, 

letters. Either from taste, from a desire to instruct herself, from a 

love of renown, or possibly from all these together, she spent her life 

with philosophers. Her rank of empress would not, perhaps, have been 

sufficient to subdue those bold spirits; but she joined to that the more 

powerful influences of wit and beauty. These three kinds of empire 

rendered less necessary to her that which consists only in art; and 

which, attentive to their tastes and their weaknesses, govern great 

minds by little means. 

 

It is said she was a philosopher. Her philosophy, however, did not 

extend so far as to give chastity to her manners. Her husband, who did 

not love her, valued her understanding so much, that he consulted her 

upon all occasions. She governed in the same manner under his son. 


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