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THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

One cause of unhappiness in a married state, is too little affection; 

and in other instances, although affection may be possessed, it is not 

shown. Montesquieu observes, "that women commonly reserve their love for 

their husbands until their husbands are dead." Sometimes a mortal hatred 

springs up, which induces a man, like Henry VIII., to cause the murder 

of those whom he has sworn to love and preserve; or a woman, like Livia, 

to poison her husband. Not only is a great dissimilarity of rank and 

condition a cause of dislike, but a great variation in age is frequently 

the cause of distrust and unhappiness. The proportion which Aristotle 

suggests (a man of thirty-seven to a woman of eighteen,) may be 

appropriate in one respect, but it is objectionable in others. The life 

of the female is just as long as that of the male; and the union of 

middle age and youth, where the one is twice as old as the other, will 

not always allow an uniformity of feelings and disposition. The case of 

Seneca (to which we have alluded,) and that of Sir Matthew Hale, are 

exceptions. Youth is generally gay, thoughtless, and frivolous; but 

life, in more advanced periods, is sober, thoughtful, and dignified. A 

husband should not be deemed a teacher or guardian for the wife so much 

as a companion; and the wife should not be considered as guardian for 

the husband: there ought to be a mutual sympathy, and in most respects 

an equality of influence. 

 

Jealousy is a passion which allows the hapless possessor to enjoy 

neither rest nor confidence. It is frequently the companion of love. 

Shakspeare says, 

 

"For where love reigns, disturbing jealousy 

Doth call himself affection's sentinel." 

 

When this principle obtains possession of the breast, it destroys the 

health and spirits: the streams which gladden the heart become 

corrupted, and productive of rage and melancholy. Jealousy is like the 

snake which insidiously entwines itself around its victim; or like the 

bohun upas of Java, which diffuses death. The bright beams of hope, 

which cheered the possessor, and carried his vision to distant days and 

distant scenes of enjoyment, are all eclipsed by this pillar of 

darkness. Moliere the poet was endowed with an eminent genius--he was 

esteemed as the first wit in Europe; but his wife was faithless, and no 

enjoyment, or success, or honor could tranquillize his mind, and make 

him happy. The attractions of youth and beauty will sometimes excite an 

illicit passion, but the indulgence of this feeling is the path to 

anxiety and degradation. The female may be less faulty; but she will be 


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