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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

Freud's service to have investigated this inadequately chronicled period 

of existence with extraordinary acumen. In so doing he made it plain 

that the "perversions" and "inversions," which reappear later under such 

striking shapes, belong to the normal sexual life of the young child and 

are seen, in veiled forms, in almost every case of nervous illness. 

 

It cannot too often be repeated that these discoveries represent no 

fanciful deductions, but are the outcome of rigidly careful observations 

which any one who will sufficiently prepare himself can verify. Critics 

fret over the amount of "sexuality" that Freud finds evidence of in the 

histories of his patients, and assume that he puts it there. But such 

criticisms are evidences of misunderstandings and proofs of ignorance. 

 

Freud had learned that the amnesias of hypnosis and of hysteria were not 

absolute but relative and that in covering the lost memories, much more, 

of unexpected sort, was often found. Others, too, had gone as far as 

this, and stopped. But this investigator determined that nothing but the 

absolute impossibility of going further should make him cease from 

urging his patients into an inexorable scrutiny of the unconscious 

regions of their memories and thoughts, such as never had been made 

before. Every species of forgetfulness, even the forgetfulness of 

childhood's years, was made to yield its hidden stores of knowledge; 

dreams, even though apparently absurd, were found to be interpreters of 

a varied class of thoughts, active, although repressed as out of harmony 

with the selected life of consciousness; layer after layer, new sets of 

motives underlying motives were laid bare, and each patient's interest 

was strongly enlisted in the task of learning to know himself in order 

more truly and wisely to "sublimate" himself. Gradually other workers 

joined patiently in this laborious undertaking, which now stands, for 

those who have taken pains to comprehend it, as by far the most 

important movement in psychopathology. 

 

It must, however, be recognized that these essays, of which Dr. Brill 

has given a translation that cannot but be timely, concern a subject 

which is not only important but unpopular. Few physicians read the works 

of v. Krafft-Ebing, Magnus Hirschfeld, Moll, and others of like sort. 

The remarkable volumes of Havelock Ellis were refused publication in his 

native England. The sentiments which inspired this hostile attitude 

towards the study of the sexual life are still active, though growing 

steadily less common. One may easily believe that if the facts which 


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