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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

Freud's truth-seeking researches forced him to recognize and to publish 

had not been of an unpopular sort, his rich and abundant contributions 

to observational psychology, to the significance of dreams, to the 

etiology and therapeutics of the psychoneuroses, to the interpretation 

of mythology, would have won for him, by universal acclaim, the same 

recognition among all physicians that he has received from a rapidly 

increasing band of followers and colleagues. 

 

May Dr. Brill's translation help toward this end. 

 

There are two further points on which some comments should be made. The 

first is this, that those who conscientiously desire to learn all that 

they can from Freud's remarkable contributions should not be content to 

read any one of them alone. His various publications, such as "The 

Selected Papers on Hysteria and Other Psychoneuroses,"[1] "The 

Interpretation of Dreams,"[2] "The Psychopathology of Everyday Life,"[3] 

"Wit and its Relation to the Unconscious,"[4] the analysis of the case 

of the little boy called Hans, the study of Leonardo da Vinci,[4a] and 

the various short essays in the four Sammlungen kleiner Schriften, not 

only all hang together, but supplement each other to a remarkable 

extent. Unless a course of study such as this is undertaken many critics 

may think various statements and inferences in this volume to be far 

fetched or find them too obscure for comprehension. 

 

The other point is the following: One frequently hears the 

psychoanalytic method referred to as if it was customary for those 

practicing it to exploit the sexual experiences of their patients and 

nothing more, and the insistence on the details of the sexual life, 

presented in this book, is likely to emphasize that notion. But the fact 

is, as every thoughtful inquirer is aware, that the whole progress of 

civilization, whether in the individual or the race, consists largely in 

a "sublimation" of infantile instincts, and especially certain portions 

of the sexual instinct, to other ends than those which they seemed 

designed to serve. Art and poetry are fed on this fuel and the evolution 

of character and mental force is largely of the same origin. All the 

forms which this sublimation, or the abortive attempts at sublimation, 

may take in any given case, should come out in the course of a thorough 

psychoanalysis. It is not the sexual life alone, but every interest and 

every motive, that must be inquired into by the physician who is seeking 

to obtain all the data about the patient, necessary for his reeducation 

and his cure. But all the thoughts and emotions and desires and motives 


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