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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

LAWS AND CUSTOMS RESPECTING THE ROMAN WOMEN. 

 

The Roman women, as well as the Grecian, were under perpetual 

guardianship; and were not at any age, nor in any condition, ever 

trusted with the management of their own fortunes. 

 

Every father had power of life and death over his own daughters: but 

this power was not restricted to daughters only; it extended also to 

sons. 

 

The Oppian law prohibited women from having more than half an ounce of 

gold employed in ornamenting their persons, from wearing clothes of 

divers colors, and from riding in chariots, either in the city, or a 

thousand paces round it. 

 

They were strictly forbid to use wine, or even to have in their 

possession the key of any place where it was kept. For either of these 

faults they were liable to be divorced by their husbands. So careful 

were the Romans in restraining their women from wine, that they are 

supposed to have first introduced the custom of saluting their female 

relations and acquaintances, on entering the house of a friend or 

neighbor, that they might discover by their breath, whether they had 

tasted any of that liquor. 

 

This strictness, however, began in time to be relaxed; until at last, 

luxury becoming too strong for every law, the women indulged themselves 

in equal liberties with the men. 

 

But such was not the case in the earlier ages of Rome. Romulus even 

permitted husbands to kill their wives, if they found them drinking 

wine. 

 

Fabius Pictor relates, that the parents of a Roman lady, having detected 

her picking the lock of a chest which contained some wine, shut her up 

and starved her to death. 

 

Women were liable to be divorced by their husbands almost at pleasure, 

provided the portion was returned which they had brought along with 

them. They were also liable to be divorced for barrenness, which, if it 

could be construed into a fault, was at least the fault of nature, and 

might sometimes be that of the husband. 

 

A few sumptuary laws, a subordination to the men, and a total want of 

authority, do not so much affect the sex, as to be coldly and 

indelicately treated by their husbands. 

 

Such a treatment is touching them in the tenderest part. Such, however 

we have reason to believe, they often met with from the Romans, who had 

not learned, as in modern times to blend the rigidity of the patriot, 

and roughness of the warrior, with that soft and indulging behavior, so 

conspicuous in our modern patriots and heroes. 

 

Husbands among the Romans not only themselves behaved roughly to their 

wives, but even sometimes permitted their servants and slaves to do the 


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