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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

SUMMARY 

 

It is now time to attempt a summing-up. We have started from the 

aberrations of the sexual impulse in reference to its object and aim and 

have encountered the question whether these originate from a congenital 

predisposition, or whether they are acquired in consequence of 

influences from life. The answer to this question was reached through an 

examination of the relations of the sexual life of psychoneurotics, a 

numerous group not very remote from the normal. This examination has 

been made through psychoanalytic investigations. We have thus found that 

a tendency to all perversions might be demonstrated in these persons in 

the form of unconscious forces revealing themselves as symptom creators 

and we could say that the neurosis is, as it were, the negative of the 

perversion. In view of the now recognized great diffusion of tendencies 

to perversion the idea forced itself upon us that the disposition to 

perversions is the primitive and universal disposition of the human 

sexual impulse, from which the normal sexual behavior develops in 

consequence of organic changes and psychic inhibitions in the course of 

maturity. We hoped to be able to demonstrate the original disposition in 

the infantile life; among the forces restraining the direction of the 

sexual impulse we have mentioned shame, loathing and sympathy, and the 

social constructions of morality and authority. We have thus been forced 

to perceive in every fixed aberration from the normal sexual life a 

fragment of inhibited development and infantilism. The significance of 

the variations of the original dispositions had to be put into the 

foreground, but between them and the influences of life we had to assume 

a relation of cooeperation and not of opposition. On the other hand, as 

the original disposition must have been a complex one, the sexual 

impulse itself appeared to us as something composed of many factors, 

which in the perversions becomes separated, as it were, into its 

components. The perversions, thus prove themselves to be on the one hand 

inhibitions, and on the other dissociations from the normal development. 

Both conceptions became united in the assumption that the sexual impulse 

of the adult due to the composition of the diverse feelings of the 

infantile life became formed into one unit, one striving, with one 

single aim. 

 

We also added an explanation for the preponderance of perversive 

tendencies in the psychoneurotics by recognizing in these tendencies 

collateral fillings of side branches caused by the shifting of the main 

river bed through repression, and we then turned our examination to the 


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