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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

of the women are separated from those of the men by a wall at which a 

guard is stationed. The wife is never allowed to eat with her husband; 

she cannot quit her apartments without permission; and he does not enter 

hers without first asking leave. Brothers are entirely separated from 

their sisters at the age of nine or ten years. 

 

 

AFRICAN WOMEN. 

 

The Africans were formerly renowned for their industry in cultivating 

the ground, for their trade, navigation, caravans and useful arts.--At 

present they are remarkable for their idleness, ignorance, superstition, 

treachery, and, above all, for their lawless methods of robbing and 

murdering all the other inhabitants of the globe. 

 

Though they still retain some sense of their infamous character, yet 

they do not choose to reform. Their priests, therefore, endeavor to 

justify them, by the following story: "Noah," say they, "was no sooner 

dead, than his three sons, the first of whom was _white_, the second 

_tawny_, and the third _black_, having agreed upon dividing among them 

his goods and possessions, spent the greatest part of the day in sorting 

them; so that they were obliged to adjourn the division till the next 

morning. Having supped and smoked a friendly pipe together, they all 

went to rest, each in his own tent. After a few hours sleep, the white 

brother got up, seized on the gold, silver, precious stones, and other 

things of the greatest value, loaded the best horses with them, and rode 

away to that country where his white posterity have been settled ever 

since. The tawny, awaking soon after, and with the same criminal 

intention, was surprised when he came to the store house to find that 

his brother had been beforehand with him. Upon which he hastily secured 

the rest of the horses and camels, and loading them with the best 

carpets, clothes, and other remaining goods, directed his route to 

another part of the world, leaving behind him, only a few of the 

coarsest goods, and some provisions of little value. 

 

When the third, or black brother, came next morning in the simplicity of 

his heart to make the proposed division, and could neither find his 

brethren, nor any of the valuable commodities, he easily judged they had 

tricked him, and were by that time fled beyond any possibility of 

discovery. 

 

In this most afflicted situation, he took his _pipe_, and begun to 

consider the most effectual means of retrieving his loss, and being 

revenged on his perfidious brothers. 

 

After revolving a variety of schemes in his mind, he at last fixed upon 

watching every opportunity of making reprisals on them, and laying hold 


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