Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

and wife of Henry VI. She was active and intrepid, a general and a 

soldier. Her genius for a long time supported her feeble husband, taught 

him to conquer, replaced him upon the throne, twice relieved him from 

prison, and though oppressed by fortune and by rebels, she did not 

yield, till she had decided in person twelve battles. 

 

The warlike spirit among the women, consistent with ages of barbarism, 

when every thing is impetuous because nothing is fixed, and when all 

excess is the excess of force, continued in Europe upwards of four 

hundred years, showing itself from time to time, and always in the 

middle of convulsions, or on the eve of great revolutions. 

 

But there were eras and countries, in which that spirit appeared with 

particular lustre. Such were the displays it made in the fifteenth and 

sixteenth centuries in Hungary, and in the Islands of the Archipelago 

and the Mediterranean, when they were invaded by the Turks. 

 

Every thing conspired to animate the women of those countries with an 

exalted courage; the prevailing spirit of the foregoing ages; the terror 

which the name of the Turks inspired; the still more dreadful 

apprehensions of an unknown enemy; the difference of _dress_, which has 

a stronger _effect_ than is commonly supposed on the imagination of a 

people; the difference of religion, which produced a kind of sacred 

horror; the striking difference of manners; and above all, the 

confinement of the female sex, which presented to the women of Europe 

nothing but the frightful ideas of servitude and a master; the groans of 

honor, the tears of beauty in the embrace of barbarism, and the double 

tyranny of love and pride! 

 

The contemplation of these objects, accordingly, roused in the hearts of 

the women a resolute courage to defend themselves; nay, sometimes even a 

courage of enthusiasm, which hurled itself against the enemy.--That 

courage, too, was augmented, by the promises of a religion, which 

offered eternal happiness in exchange for the sufferings of a moment. 

 

It is not therefore surprising, that when three beautiful women of the 

isle of Cyprus were led prisoners to Selim, to be secluded in the 

seraglio, one of them, preferring death to such a condition, conceived 

the project of setting fire to the magazine; and after having 

communicated her design to the rest, put it in execution. 

 

The year following, a city of Cyprus being besieged by the Turks, the 

women ran in crowds, mingling themselves with the soldiers, and, 

fighting gallantly in the breach, were the means of saving their 

country. 


Page 4 from 7:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   Forward