Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

 

Under Mahomet II. a girl of the isle of Lemnos, armed with the sword and 

shield of her father, who had fallen in battle, opposed the Turks, when 

they had forced a gate, and chased them to the shore. 

 

In the two celebrated sieges of Rhodes and Malta, the women, seconding 

the zeal of the knights, discovered upon all occasions the greatest 

intrepidity; not only that impetuous and temporary impulse which 

despises death, but that cool and deliberate fortitude which can support 

the continued hardships, the toils, and the miseries of war. 

 

 

OTHER PARTICULARS RESPECTING FEMALES DURING THE AGE OF CHIVALRY. 

 

When a man had said any thing that reflected dishonor on a woman, or 

accused her of a crime, she was not obliged to fight him to prove her 

innocence: the combat would have been unequal. But she might choose a 

champion to fight in her cause, or expose himself to the horrid trial, 

in order to clear her reputation. Such champions were generally selected 

from her lovers or friends. But if she fixed upon any other, so high was 

the spirit of martial glory, and so eager the thirst of defending the 

weak and helpless sex, that we meet with no instance of a champion ever 

having refused to fight for, or undergo whatever custom required, in 

defence of the lady who had honored him with the appointment. 

 

To the motives already mentioned, we may add another. He who had 

refused, must inevitably have been branded with the name of coward: and, 

so despicable was the condition of a coward, in those times of general 

heroism, that death itself appeared the more preferable choice. Nay, 

such was the rage of fighting for women, that it became customary for 

those who could not be honored with the decision of their real quarrels, 

to create fictitious ones concerning them, in order to create also a 

necessity of fighting. 

 

Nor was fighting for the ladies confined to single combatants. Crowds of 

gallants entered the lists against each other. Even kings called out 

their subjects, to shew their love for their mistresses, by cutting the 

throats of their neighbors, who had not in the least offended. 

 

In the fourteenth century, when the Countess of Blois and the widow of 

Mountford were at war against each other, a conference was agreed to, on 

pretence of settling a peace, but in reality to appoint a combat. 

Instead of negotiating, they soon challenged each other; and Beaumanoir, 

who was at the head of the Britons, publicly declared that they fought 

for no other motive, than to see, by the victory, who had the fairest 

mistress. 

 

In the fifteenth century, we find an anecdote of this kind still more 


Page 5 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   7   Forward