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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

extraordinary. John, duke de Bourbonnois, published a declaration, that 

he would go over to England, with sixteen knights, and there fight it 

out, in order to avoid idleness, and merit the good graces of his 

mistress. 

 

James IV. of Scotland, having, in all tournaments, professed himself 

knight to queen Anne of France, she summoned him to prove himself her 

true and valorous champion, by taking the field in her defence, against 

his brother-in-law, Henry VIII. of England. He obeyed the romantic 

mandate; and the two nations bled to feed the vanity of a woman. 

 

Warriors, when ready to engage, invoked the aid of their mistresses, as 

poets do that of the Muses. If they fought valiantly, it reflected honor 

on the Dulcineas they adored; but if they turned their backs on their 

enemies, the poor ladies were dishonored forever. 

 

Love, was at that time, the most prevailing motive to fighting. The 

famous Gaston de Foix, who commanded the French troops at the battle of 

Ravenna, took advantage of this foible of his army. He rode from rank to 

rank, calling his officers by name, and even some of his private men, 

recommending to them their country, their honor, and, above all, to shew 

what they could do for their mistresses. 

 

The women of those ages, the reader may imagine, were certainly more 

completely happy than in any other period of the world. This, however, 

was not in reality the case. 

 

Custom, which governs all things with the most absolute sway, had, 

through a long succession of years, given her sanction to such combats 

as were undertaken, either to defend the innocence, or display the 

beauty of women. Custom, therefore, either obliged a man to fight for a 

woman who desired him, or marked the refusal with infamy and disgrace. 

But custom did not oblige him, in every other part of his conduct, to 

behave to this woman, or to the sex in general, with that respect and 

politeness which have happily distinguished the character of more modern 

times. 

 

The same man who would have encountered giants, or gigantic 

difficulties, "when a lady was in the case," had but little idea of 

adding to her happiness, by supplying her with the comforts and 

elegancies of life. And, had she asked him to stoop, and ease her of a 

part of that domestic slavery which, almost in every country, falls to 

the lot of women, he would have thought himself quite affronted. 

 

But besides, men had nothing else, in those ages, than that kind of 

romantic gallantry to recommend them. Ignorant of letters, arts, and 


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