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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

sciences, and every thing that refines human nature, they were, in every 

thing where gallantry was not concerned, rough and unpolished in their 

manners and behavior. Their time was spent in drinking, war, gallantry, 

and idleness. In their hours of relaxation, they were but little in 

company with their women; and when they were, the indelicacies of the 

carousal, or the cruelties of the field, were almost the only subjects 

they had to talk of. 

 

From the subversion of the Roman empire, to the fourteenth or fifteenth 

century, women spent most of their time alone. They were almost entire 

strangers to the joys of social life. They seldom went abroad, but to be 

spectators of such public diversions and amusements as the fashion of 

the times countenanced. Francis I. was the first monarch who introduced 

them on public days to court. 

 

Before his time, nothing was to be seen at any of the courts of Europe, 

but long bearded politicians, plotting the destruction of the rights and 

liberties of mankind; and warriors clad in complete armor, ready to put 

their plots in execution. 

 

In the eighth century, so slavish was the condition of women on the one 

hand, and so much was beauty coveted on the other, that, for about two 

hundred years, the kings of Austria were obliged to pay a tribute to the 

Moors, of one hundred beautiful virgins per annum. 

 

In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, elegance had scarcely any 

existence, and even cleanliness was hardly considered as laudable. The 

use of linen was not known; and the most delicate of the fair sex wore 

woollen shifts. 

 

In the time of Henry VIII. the peers of the realm carried their wives 

behind them on horseback when they went to London; and, in the same 

manner, took them back to their country seats, with hoods of waxed linen 

over their heads, and wrapped in mantles of cloth, to secure them from 

the cold. 

 

There was one misfortune of a singular nature, to which women were 

liable in those days: they were in perpetual danger of being accused of 

witchcraft, and suffering all the cruelties and indignities of a mob, 

instigated by superstition and directed by enthusiasm; or of being 

condemned by laws, which were at once a disgrace to humanity and to 

sense. Even the bloom of youth and beauty could not secure them from 

torture and from death. But when age and wrinkles attacked a woman, if 

any thing uncommon happened in her neighborhood, she was almost sure of 

atoning with her life for a crime it was impossible for her to commit. 

 


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