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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

time and money; and, should he refuse her any request, whether 

reasonable or capricious, it would reflect eternal dishonor upon him 

among the men, and make him the detestation of all the women. 

 

But, in no situation does their character appear so whimsical, or their 

power so conspicuous, as when they are pregnant. In this case, whatever 

they long for, whatever they ask, or whatever they have an inclination 

to do, they must be indulged in. 

 

 

ENGLISH WOMEN. 

 

The women of England are eminent for many good qualities both of the 

head and of the heart. There we meet with that inexpressible softness 

and delicacy of manners, which, cultivated by education, appears as much 

superior to what it does without it, as the polished diamond appears 

superior to that which is rough from the mine. In some parts of the 

world, women have attained to so little knowledge and so little 

consequence, that we consider their virtues as merely of the negative 

kind. In England they consist not only in abstinence from evil, but in 

doing good. 

 

There we see the sex every day exerting themselves in acts of 

benevolence and charity, in relieving the distresses of the body, and 

binding up the wounds of the mind; in reconciling the differences of 

friends, and preventing the strife of enemies; and, to sum up all, in 

that care and attention to their offspring, which is so necessary and 

essential a part of their duty. 

 

A woman may succeed to the throne of England with the same power and 

privileges as a king; and the business of the state is transacted in her 

name, while her husband is only a subject. The king's wife is considered 

as a subject; but is exempted from the law which forbids any married 

woman to possess property in her own right during the lifetime of her 

husband; she may sue any person at law without joining her husband in 

the suit; may buy and sell lands without his interference; and she may 

dispose of her property by will, as if she were a single woman. She 

cannot be fined by any court of law; but is liable to be tried and 

punished for crimes by peers of the realm. The queen dowager enjoys 

nearly the same privileges that she did before she became a widow; and 

if she marries a subject still continues to retain her rank and title; 

but such marriages cannot take place without permission from the 

reigning sovereign. A woman who is noble in her own right, retains her 

title when she marries a man of inferior rank; but if ennobled by her 

husband, she loses the title by marrying a commoner. A peeress can only 

be tried by a jury of peers. 

 


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