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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

In old times, a woman who was convicted of being a common mischief-maker 

and scold, was sentenced to the punishment of the ducking-stool; which 

consisted of a sort of chair fastened to a pole, in which she was seated 

and repeatedly let down into the water, amid the shouts of the rabble. 

At Newcastle-upon-Tyne, a woman convicted of the same offence was led 

about the streets by the hangman, with an instrument of iron bars fitted 

on her head, like a helmet. A piece of sharp iron entered the mouth, and 

severely pricked the tongue whenever the culprit attempted to move it. 

 

A great deal of vice prevails in England, among the very fashionable, 

and the very low classes. Misconduct and divorces are not unfrequent 

among the former, because their mode of life corrupts their principles, 

and they deem themselves above the jurisdiction of popular opinion; the 

latter feel as if they were beneath the influence of public censure, and 

find it very difficult to be virtuous, on account of extreme poverty, 

and the consequent obstructions in the way of marriage. But the general 

character of English women is modest, reserved, sincere, and dignified. 

They have strong passions and affections, which often develope 

themselves in the most beautiful forms of domestic life. They are in 

general remarkable for a healthy appearance, and an exquisite bloom of 

complexion. Perhaps the world does not present a lovelier or more 

graceful picture than the English home of a virtuous family. 


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