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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

outdone every one of them: 

 

"Men some to pleasure, some to business take; 

But every woman is at heart--a rake." 

 

Swift and Dr Young have hardly been behind this celebrated splenetic in 

illiberality. They perhaps were not favorites of the fair, and in 

revenge vented all their envy and spleen against them. But a more modern 

and accomplished writer who by his rank in life, by his natural and 

acquired _graces_, was undoubtedly a favorite, has repaid their kindness 

by taking every opportunity of exhibiting them in the most contemptible 

light. "Almost every man," says he, "may be gained some way, almost 

every woman any way, can any thing exhibit a stronger caution to the 

sex?" It is fraught with information; and it is to be hoped they will 

use it accordingly. 

 

[1] Xantippe, was the wife of Socrates, and the most famous scold 

of antiquity. 

 

 

FEMALE SIMPLICITY. 

 

Would we conceive properly of that simplicity which is the sweetest 

expression of a well-informed and well-meaning mind, which every where 

diffuses tenderness and delicacy, sweetens the relations of life, and 

gives a zest to the minutest duties of humanity, let us contemplate 

every perceptible operation of nature, the twilight of the evening, the 

pearly dew-drops of the early morning, and all that various growth which 

indicates the genial return of spring. The same principle from which all 

that is soft and pleasing, amiable or exquisite, to the eye or to the 

ear, in the exterior frame of nature, produces that taste for true 

simplicity, which is one of the most useful, as well as the most elegant 

lessons, that _ladies_ can learn. 

 

Infancy, is perhaps, the finest and most perfect illustration of 

simplicity. It is a state of genuine nature throughout. The feelings of 

children are under no kind of restraint, but pure as the fire, free as 

the winds, honest and open as the face of heaven. Their joys incessantly 

flow in the thickest succession, and their griefs only seem fleeting and 

evanescent. To the calls of nature they are only attentive. They know no 

voice but hers. Their obedience to all her commands is prompt and 

implicit. They never anticipate her bounties, nor relinquish her 

pleasures. This situation renders them independent of artifice. 

Influenced only by nature, their manners, like the principle that 

produces them, are always the same. 

 

Genuine simplicity is that peculiar quality of the mind, by which some 

happy characters are enabled to avoid the most distant approaches to any 

thing like affectation, inconstancy, or design, in their intercourse 


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