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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

sweetest lustre, and diffuse their richest fragrance. 

 

Heaven has not a finer or more perfect emblem on earth than a woman of 

genuine simplicity. She affects no graces which are not inspired by 

sincerity. Her opinions result not from passion and fancy, but from 

reason and experience. Candor and humility give expansion to her heart. 

She struggles for no kind of chimerical credit, disclaims the appearance 

of every affectation, and is in all things just what she seems, and 

others would be thought. Nature, not art, is the great standard of her 

manners; and her exterior wears no varnish, or embellishment, which is 

not the genuine signature of an open, undesigning, and benevolent mind. 

It is not in her power, because not in her nature, to hide, with a 

fawning air, and a mellow voice, her aversion or contempt, where her 

delicacy is hurt, here temper ruffled, or her feelings insulted. 

 

In short, whatever appears most amiable, lovely, or interesting in 

nature, art, manners, or life, originates in simplicity. What is 

correctness in taste, purity in morals, truth in science, grace in 

beauty, but simplicity? It is the garb of innocence. It adorned the 

first ages, and still adorns the infant state of humanity. Without 

simplicity, woman is a vixen, a coquette, a hypocrite; society a 

masquerade, and pleasure a phantom. 

 

The following story, I believe, is pretty generally known. A lady, whose 

husband had long been afflicted with an acute but lingering disease, 

suddenly feigned such an uncommon _tenderness_ for him, as to resolve on 

dying in his stead. She had even the address to persuade him not to 

outlive this extraordinary instance of her conjugal fidelity and 

attachment. It was instantaneously agreed they should mutually swallow 

such a quantity of arsenic, as would speedily effect their dreadful 

purpose. She composed the fatal draught before his face and even set him 

the desperate example of drinking first. By this device, which had all 

the appearance of the greatest affection and candor, the dregs only were 

reserved for him, and soon put a period to his life. 

 

It then appeared that the dose was so tempered, as, from the weight of 

the principal ingredient, to be deadly only at the bottom, which she had 

artfully appropriated for his share. Even after all this finesse, she 

seized, we are told, his inheritance, and insulted his memory by a 

second marriage. 

 


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