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THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

THE MILD MAGNANIMITY OF WOMEN. 

 

A late eminent anatomist, in a professional discourse on the female 

frame, is said to have declared, that it almost appeared an act of 

cruelty in nature to produce such a being as woman. This remark may, 

indeed, be the natural exclamation of refined sensibility, in 

contemplating the various maladies to which a creature of such delicate 

organs is inevitably exposed; but, if we take a more enlarged survey of 

human existence, we shall be far from discovering any just reason to 

arraign the benevolence of its provident and gracious Author. If the 

delicacy of woman must render her familiar with pain and sickness, let 

us remember that her charms, her pleasures, and her happiness, arise 

also from the same attractive quality. She is a being, to use the 

forcible and elegant expression of a poet, 

 

"Fine by defect, and admirably weak." 

 

There is, perhaps, no charm by which she more effectually secures the 

tender admiration and the lasting love, of the more hardy sex, than her 

superior endurance, her mild and _graceful_ submission to the common 

evils of life. 

 

Nor is this the sole advantage she derives from her gentle fortitude. It 

is the prerogative of this lovely virtue, to lighten the pressure of all 

those incorrigible evils which it cheerfully endures. The frame of man 

may be compared to the sturdy _oak_, which is often shattered by 

resisting the tempest. Woman is the pliant _osier_, which, in bending to 

the storm, eludes its violence. 

 

The accurate observers of human nature will readily allow, that patience 

is most eminently the characteristic of woman. To what a sublime and 

astonishing height this virtue has been carried by beings of the most 

delicate texture, we have striking examples in the many female martyrs 

who were exposed, in the first ages of christianity, to the most 

barbarous and lingering torture. 

 

Nor was it only from christian zeal that woman derived the power of 

defying the utmost rigors of persecution with invincible fortitude. 

Saint Ambrose, in his elaborate and pious treatise on this subject, 

records the resolution of a fair disciple of Pythagoras, who, being 

severely urged by a tyrant to reveal the secrets of her sex, to convince 

him that no torments should reduce her to so unworthy a breach of her 

vow, bit her own _tongue_ asunder, and darted it in the face of her 

oppressor. 

 

In consequence of those happy changes which have taken place in the 

world, from the progress of purified religion, the inexpressible spirit 

of the tender sex is no longer exposed to such inhuman trials. But if 


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