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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

was that their ideas of delicacy were so highly refined, that they could 

not even bear the secret consciousness of an involuntary crime, and far 

less of having tacitly consented to it. 

 

 

INFLUENCE OF FEMALE SOCIETY. 

 

The company of ladies has a very powerful influence on the sentiments 

and conduct of men. Women, the fruitful source of half our joys, and 

perhaps of _more_ than half our sorrows, give an elegance to our manner, 

and a relish to our pleasures. They soothe our afflictions, and soften 

our cares. Too much of their company will render us effeminate, and 

infallibly stamp upon us many signatures of the female nature. A rough 

and unpolished behavior, as well as slovenliness of person, will 

certainly be the consequence of an almost constant exclusion from it. By 

spending a reasonable portion of our time in the company of women, and 

another in the company of our own sex, we shall imbibe a proper share of 

the softness of the female, and at the same time retain the firmness and 

constancy of the male. 

 

As little social intercourse subsisted between the two sexes, in the 

more early ages of antiquity, we find the men less courteous, and the 

women less engaging. Vivacity and cheerfulness seem hardly to have 

existed. Even the Babylonians, who appear to have allowed their women 

more liberty than any of the ancients, seem not to have lived with them 

in a friendly and familiar manner. But, as their intercourse with them 

was considerably greater than that of the neighboring nations, they 

acquired thereby a polish and refinement unknown to any of the people 

who surrounded them. The manners of both sexes were softer, and better 

calculated to please. 

 

They likewise paid more attention to cleanliness and dress. 

 

After the Greeks became famous for their knowledge of the arts and 

sciences, their rudeness and barbarity were only softened a _few 

degrees_. It is not therefore arts, sciences, and _learning_, but the 

company of the other sex, that forms the manner and renders the man 

_agreeable_. 

 

The Romans were, for some time, a community without any thing to soften 

the ferocity of male nature. The Sabine virgins, whom they had stolen, 

appear to have infused into them the first ideas of politeness. But it 

was many ages before this politeness banished the roughness of the 

warrior, and assumed the refinement of the gentleman. 

 

During the times of chivalry, female influence was at the zenith of its 

glory and perfection. It was the source of valor, it gave birth to 

politeness, it awakened pity, it called forth benevolence, it restricted 


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