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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

MONASTIC LIFE. 

 

The venerable _Bede_ has given us a very striking picture of Monastic 

enormities, in his epistle to Egbert. From this we learn that many young 

men who had no title to the monastic profession, got possession of 

monasteries; where, instead of engaging in the defence of their country, 

as their age and rank required, they indulged themselves in the most 

dissolute indolence. 

 

We learn from Dugdale, that in the reign of Henry the Second, the nuns 

of Amsbury abbey in Wiltshire were expelled from that religious house on 

account of their incontinence. And to exhibit in the most lively colors 

the total corruption of monastic chastity, bishop Burnet informs us in 

his "History of the Reformation," that when the nunneries were visited 

by the command of Henry the VIII. "whole houses almost, were found whose 

vows had been made in vain." 

 

When we consider to what oppressive indolence, to what a variety of 

wretchedness and guilt, the young and fair inhabitants of the cloister 

were frequently betrayed, we ought to admire those benevolent authors 

who, when the tide of religious prejudice ran very strong in favor of 

monastic virginity, had spirit enough to oppose the torrent, and to 

caution the devout and tender sex against so dangerous a profession. It 

is in this point of view that the character of Erasmus appears with the 

most amiable lustre; and his name ought to be eternally dear to the 

female world in particular. Though his studies and constitution led him 

almost to idolize those eloquent fathers of the church who have 

magnified this kind of life, his good sense and his accurate survey of 

the human race, enabled him to judge of the misery in which female youth 

was continually involved by a precipitate choice of the veil. He knew 

the successful arts by which the subtle and rapacious monks inveigled 

young women of opulent families into the cloister; and he exerted his 

lively and delicate wit in opposition to so pernicious an evil. 

 

In those nations of Europe where nunneries still exist, how many lovely 

victims are continually sacrificed to the avarice or absurd ambition of 

inhuman parents! The misery of these victims has been painted with great 

force by some benevolent writers of France. 

 

In most of those pathetic histories that are founded on the abuse of 

convents, the misery originates from the parent, and falls upon the 

child. The reverse has sometime happened; and there are examples of 

unhappy parents, who have been rendered miserable by the religious 

perversity of a daughter. In the fourteenth volume of that very amusing 


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