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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

work, _Les Causes Celebres_, a work which is said to have been the 

favorite reading of Voltaire, there is a striking history of a girl 

under age, who was tempted by pious artifice to settle herself in a 

convent, in express opposition to parental authority. Her parents, who 

had in vain tried the most tender persuasion, endeavored at last to 

redeem their lost child, by a legal process against the nunnery in which 

she was imprisoned. The pleadings on this remarkable trial may, perhaps, 

be justly reckoned amongst the finest pieces of eloquence that the 

lawyers of France have produced. Monsieur Gillet, the advocate for the 

parents, represented, in the boldest and most affecting language, the 

extreme baseness of this religious seduction. His eloquence appeared to 

have fixed the sentiments of the judges; but the cause of superstition 

was pleaded by an advocate of equal power, and it finally prevailed. The 

unfortunate parents of Maria Vernal (for this was the name of the 

unfortunate girl) were condemned to resign her forever, and to make a 

considerable payment to those artful devotees who had piously robbed 

them of their child. 

 

When we reflect on the various evils that have arisen in convents, we 

have the strongest reason to rejoice and glory in that reformation by 

which the nunneries of England were abolished. Yet it would not be 

candid or just to consider all these as the mere harbors of 

licentiousness; since we are told that, at the time of their 

suppression, some of our religious houses were very honorably 

distinguished by the purity of their inhabitants. "The visitors," says 

Bishop Burnet, "interceded earnestly for one nunnery in Oxfordshire, 

where there was great strictness of life, and to which most of the young 

gentlewomen of the country were sent to be bred; so that the gentry of 

the country desired the king would spare the house: yet all was 

ineffectual." 

 

 

DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS. 

 

In the earlier ages, sentiment in love does not appear to have been much 

attended to. When Abraham sent his servant to court a bride for his son 

Isaac, we do not so much as hear that Isaac was consulted on the matter: 

nor is there even a suspicion, that he might refuse or dislike the wife 

which his father had selected for him. 

 

From the manner in which Rebecca was solicited, we learn, that women 

were not then courted in person by the lover, but by a proxy, whom he, 

or his parents, deputed in his stead. We likewise see, that this proxy 

did not, as in modern times, endeavor to gain the affection of the lady 


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