Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS. 

 

The marriage life is always an insipid, a vexatious, or a happy 

condition, the first is, when two people of no taste meet together, upon 

such a settlement as has been thought reasonable by parents and 

conveyancers, from an exact valuation of the land and cash of both 

parties. In this case the young lady's person is no more regarded than 

the house and improvements in purchase of an estate; but she goes with 

her fortune, rather than her fortune with her. These make up the crowd 

or vulgar of the rich, and fill up the lumber of the human race, without 

beneficence towards those below them, or respect towards those above 

them; and lead a despicable, independent, and useless life, without 

sense of the laws of kindness, good-nature, mutual offices, and the 

elegant satisfactions which flow from reason and virtue. 

 

The vexatious life arises from a conjunction of two people of quick 

taste and resentment, put together for reasons well known to their 

friends, in which especial care is taken to avoid (what they think the 

chief of evils) poverty; and ensure them riches with every evil besides. 

These good people live in a constant restraint before company, and when 

alone, revile each other's person and conduct. In company they are in 

purgatory; when by themselves, in hell. 

 

The happy marriage is, where two persons meet, and voluntarily make 

choice of each other without principally regarding or neglecting the 

circumstances of fortune or beauty. These may still love in spite of 

adversity or sickness. The former we may in some measure defend 

ourselves from; the other is the common lot of humanity. Love has 

nothing to do with riches or state. Solitude, with the person beloved, 

has a pleasure, even in a woman's mind, beyond show or pomp. 

 

 

BETROTHING AND MARRIAGE. 

 

At a very early period, families who lived in a friendly manner, fell 

upon a method of securing their children to each other by what is called 

in the sacred writings Betrothing. This was agreeing on a price to be 

paid for the bride, the time when it should be paid, and when she should 

be delivered into the hands of her husband. 

 

There were, according to the Talmudists, three ways of betrothing. The 

first by a written contract. The second, by a verbal agreement, 

accompanied with a piece of money. And the third, by the parties coming 

together, and living as husband and wife; which might as properly be 

called marriage as betrothing. 

 

The written contract was in the following manner--"On such a day, month, 

year, A the son of B, has said to D the daughter of E, be thou my spouse 


Page 1 from 4: [1]  2   3   4   Forward