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Table of contents
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-1
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-2
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-3
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-4
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-5
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-6
THE FIRST WOMAN, AND HER ANTEDILUVIAN DESCENDANTS-7
DEGREES OF SENTIMENTAL ATTACHMENT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS-8
A VIEW OF MATRIMONY IN THREE DIFFERENT LIGHTS
FEMALE FRIENDSHIP
A LETTER TO A NEW MARRIED MAN
ITALIAN DEBAUCHERY
CUSTOM IN THE MOGUL EMPIRE
ANECDOTE OF CAESAR
POWER OF PHILTRES AND CHARMS
LAPLAND AND GREENLAND LADY
ART OF DETERMINING THE PRECISE FIGURE, THE DEGREE OF BEAUTY,THE HABITS, AND THE AGE, OF WOMEN, NOTWITHSTANDING THE AIDS AND DISGUISES OF DRESS
THE IDEAL OF FEMALE BEAUTY; OR A DESCRIPTION OF THE FAMOUS STATUE OF THE VENUS DE MEDICI
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-1
AN ESSAY ON MATRIMONY-2
Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex. PREFACE
THE SEXUAL ABERRATIONS-1.1
DEVIATION IN REFERENCE TO THE SEXUAL AIM-1.2
GENERAL STATEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL PERVERSIONS-1.3
PARTIAL IMPULSES AND EROGENOUS ZONES-1.4
THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.1
THE SEXUAL AIM OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.2
THE INFANTILE SEXUAL INVESTIGATION-2.3
THE SOURCES OF THE INFANTILE SEXUALITY-2.4
THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBERTY-3
THE THEORY OF THE LIBIDO-3.1
SUMMARY-3.2
SUMMARY-3.3
INDEX-1
INDEX-2
INDEX-3

them, by the multitudes of their sons and of their daughters." 

 

After the virgins had sung a marriage song, the company partook of a 

repast, the most magnificent the parties could afford; after which they 

began a dance, the men round the bridegroom, the women round the bride. 

They pretended that this dance was of divine institution and an 

essential part of the ceremony. The bride was then carried to the 

nuptial bed, and the bridegroom left with her. The company again 

returned to their feasting and rejoicing; and the Rabbies inform us, 

that this feasting, when the bride, was a widow, lasted only three days, 

but seven if she was a virgin. 

 

At the birth of a son, the father planted a cedar; and at that of a 

daughter, he planted a pine. Of these trees the nuptial bed was 

constructed, when the parties, at whose birth they were planted, entered 

into the married state. 

 

The Assyrians had a court, or tribunal whose only business was to 

dispose of young women in marriage, and see the laws of that union 

properly executed. What these laws were, or how the execution of them 

was enforced, are circumstances that have not been handed down to us. 

But the erecting a court solely for the purpose of taking cognizance of 

them, suggests an idea that they were many and various. 

 

Among the Greeks, the multiplicity of male and female deities who were 

concerned in the affairs of love, made the invocations and sacrifices on 

a matrimonial occasion a very tedious affair. Fortunate omens gave great 

joy, and the most fortunate of all others was a pair of turtles seen in 

the air, as those birds were reckoned the truest emblems of conjugal 

love and fidelity. If, however, one of them was seen alone it infallibly 

denoted separation, and all the ills attending an unhappy marriage. 

 

On the wedding day, the bride and bridegroom were richly dressed, and 

adorned with garlands of herbs and flowers. The bride was conducted in 

the evening to the house of her husband in a chariot, seated between her 

husband and one of his relations. When she alighted from the chariot the 

axle-tree of it was burnt to show that there was no method for her to 

return back. As soon as the young couple entered the house, figs and 

other fruits were thrown upon their heads to denote plenty; and a 

sumptuous entertainment was ready for them to partake of, to which all 

the relations on both sides were invited. 

 

The bride was lighted to bed by a number of torches, according to her 

quality; and the company returned in the morning to salute the new 


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